Should I learn JS before PHP

Javascript, HTML, CSS, Java, Ruby or PHP?

Javascript is one of the strongest and fastest growing languages ​​of our time. It has become indispensable in many areas, especially on the web, and it is highly innovative. It feels like new frameworks and dialects are added every week and there is a lot of movement in the scene.

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The advantages for beginners: You can achieve results very quickly thanks to the browser integration - without much set-up in advance. Browser integration was just the beginning of Javascript. For some time now, the language has found its way into backend systems and serverless environments, where it is growing very quickly. The lack of typing is often criticized, but Javascript is very fast and flexible. There are now many tools, apps and integrations that rely heavily on Javascript.

HTML and CSS: Both (markup) languages ​​are easy to learn, produce results quickly and are indispensable for everyone who develops front-ends for websites. Therefore it is the absolute standard to master both.

Java is very common and used for many purposes. The language offers a very good basis for technological advancement in the job. If you are interested in developing mobile apps (Android) or would like to build larger service-oriented applications in the enterprise sector, you should start with Java.

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Ruby: Startups often program their websites in this language. It was almost invisible for a long time and only became known through the Rails framework. It should be mentioned here that, as with Java, everything is an object, which initially presents some with a certain challenge in understanding. The creator of Ruby wanted programmers to enjoy the language.

PHP: For those who want to focus solely on web development, PHP is a good programming language to get started with. The language still powers most of the popular websites and has a very large community. It offers a large number of frameworks that developers can use to create general and industry-specific apps - unfortunately the API is not as clean, well-thought-out and consistent as with other languages ​​such as Java. In addition, the longer term future of PHP is in question. It seems that it is currently being overtaken by other technologies and may be left behind in the medium term.

The most important thing is a specific project

No matter which programming language you choose to get started, the main thing is to learn the basics by working on a specific project and to apply them in practice. It helps sustainably and fastest if you deal with real problems and gain your own first insights and experiences. Building something, working on something real and creating solutions is the path to becoming a top developer. The best thing to do is to try out different technologies that give you the basis for developing quickly in other technologies. The most important thing is not to learn the first language, but to learn structural thinking, design patterns, object-oriented programming and / or procedural programming and to be able to apply them safely to the problem. And to develop some important personal characteristics that no developer should be missing: to be willing to learn, curious, open and polyglot, without dogma - throughout the entire career.

About the author: André Schade started out as a career changer (studying biochemistry) in software development. He has worked for many years as a software engineer in the web environment, found his love for DevOps and managed and coached development teams in complex technology environments. Today he works as Head of Development at 4scotty. Golem.de cooperates with 4Scotty. Interested parties can post their profile under the navigation point IT heads on Golem.de and let companies find them.

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